Sunday Stew (AIP & low-FODMAP)

This is my introductory-level heart recipe.

Because I needed one!

Last April I made a resolution to start eating organ meats. I’m proud that I now eat liver & heart on a weekly basis.

But that took some doing.

If you find it challenging to approach a great gnarly heart in the middle of your cutting board, I understand. I wrote a blog post about that: Have Heart!

If you have trouble with the notion of eating heart, the secret is to cut the heart exactly like stew beef and cook it, long & slow, together with stew beef in a 1:2 ratio.

If you are very disquieted, be soothed by the statistical probability that in any given spoonful, you are more likely to be eating stew beef than heart. In any case, you can’t tell the difference.

This is the recipe I often make on Sundays. Sunday morning for Sunday supper, or Sunday evening for Monday breakfast.

The world is a better place when start my workweek off with super-nourishing ready-made food in the fridge.

Sunday Stew (AIP & low-FODMAP)

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 from petra8paleo

Sunday stew with lamb chops

Sunday stew with lamb chops

  • 1 bison heart (or the the heart of another ruminant)
  • 2lbs stew-cut beef or venison
  • 2 teaspoons Himalayan salt
  • 2 tablespoons bacon fat or coconut oil
  • 5 cups Bone Broth
  • 1 heaping tablespoon Savory
  • 1 carrot, cut into a micro-dice (optional)
  • 1 bunch greens (chard, spinach), chopped
  • 2 lamb chops (optional: see variation, below)

Trim & cut the heart into cubes the same size as your stew meat.

Put all your heart & stew meat into a bowl, add salt & stir to coat.

Melt the fat in a large frying pan & brown the cubed meat in the fat in batches, ensuring several sides get nice & browned.

Add the browned meat to the slow cooker, add the Savory & pour the Bone Broth over top. Deglaze the frying pan with some of the bone broth & add this meaty mixture in, too.

carrots for stew 2Cook 9 or so hours on low (overnight or all day).

Then, add the micro-diced carrot, if using.

If you want to freeze some, remove that quantity now, before the greens go in.

Add the chopped greens to the pot, stir gently & let the stew cook for 15 more minutes.

Serve with a side of sliced cucumbers & olives for a low-FODMAP feast.

Lamb Chop variation

If I’m going to have a particularly busy week,  I lay a couple of (lightly salted) lamb chops on top of the stew before cooking. I pop them in a container in the fridge before adding the carrots or greens. Then all I need to do is reheat them in the oven to have meltingly delicious lamb chops for Tuesday night supper.

24 Comments

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24 responses to “Sunday Stew (AIP & low-FODMAP)

  1. Pingback: Have Heart! | petra8paleo

  2. You make me chuckle.
    I may even pluck up the courage to try a heart stew when I fathom out where I can get one from.

    • Ask your butcher. It’s the kind of thing butcher’s tend to have in the freezer in the back, not out in the display case. If a butcher doesn’t stock them, they can definitely get them in.

  3. Alice

    This is a *great* recipe. I don’t have a bison heart in the freezer at the moment, but this goes on my list for the farmer’s market on Saturday. I’ll pick up some venison then too; in my opinion venison is essential for good stew. Thank you!

  4. I’m with CoolMoxie, you make me laugh! Great post!

  5. Kathy

    Could you use beef heart? Don’t get bison here in South Africa.

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  8. Hilde Tipton

    I made this and it was wonderful! I did change it a little (just because I am always fiddling): rolled the meat in equal parts onion salt and garlic salt before browning and added a big cut up onion to the stew mixture. Cut up Swiss chard and when the stew was cooked, poured it over the raw greens, which wilted instantly. Thank you SO MUCH for this recipe. It’s the first time I have successfully sneaked heart by my husband.

    • I’m really happy it passed the husband test at your house! Great idea to wilt the chard with the hot broth. The onion & garlic would be yummy, too, except that aliums are high-FODMAP (except the green parts of spring onions, weirdly) & so aren’t included in a low-FODMAP protocol.

      • Hilde Tipton

        Thanks for clarifying regarding the onion/garlic salt. I did not know that (am not doing low FODMAP).

  9. Lisa

    Parsnip or Rhutabaga are nice changes of flavor in place of the carrot. I know, but I LOVE Parsnips.

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  11. Laurie

    I think it is, but I wanted to confirm if this was Wahls Paleo+ approved as well.

  12. Yes it is, keeping in mind, on the Wahls Paleo plus, you’ll want to limit higher-carb vegetables like carrots to a couple of times per week (based on your carb tolerance, some people can stay ketogenic with more carbs).

  13. Sarah

    Hi, just found your site as I am just beginning to add offal meat into my diet. Also looking for minimal prep meals such as this. About how many servings does it make? Also, if freezing, do you Let the carrots cook before you set aside the portion you’re freezing? Thanks!

    • Hi Sarah, assuming your heart is about 1lb, that’s 3lbs of meat altogether. Many people aim for 8-12 oz of meat a day to optimize, though some paleo people eat more. So, assuming you are aiming for 4 oz of meat in a meal, there’s 12 portions here. And yes, I’d probably freeze my stew with the cooked carrots, so that once it’s defrosted, it’s an insta-meal. When reheating, I’d probably also throw in a handful of (prewashed) spinach~.

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  17. Amy

    What type of savory do you recommend (Winter/summer)? And do you have substitutions if I can not get any savory?

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